About

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Academics

The University of Dallas is a small Catholic university that aims to unite its “community of learners” by having them “[investigate] the same essential questions of human life.” This is accomplished through the school’s Great Books curriculum, which puts all 1,500 undergrads through a sequence of nineteen core English, philosophy, and history courses. While this focus on primary texts leads to a “heavy homework load,” students embrace this “rigorous, but reasonably so” coursework, saying that it creates “thoughtful and provoking discussions” that encourage them to develop “independent and opposing viewpoints to aid in a well-rounded education.” Further setting UD apart from other institutions is the way it uses its “extremely well-established” Rome Program to encourage students to visit notable cities from their studies: “it’s one thing to read and discuss the Great Books in a Texas classroom, and another to do so while immersed in the places where those books were written.”

University of Dallas professors are the cornerstone of enrollee support. Instructors “care about their students and the UD community at large,” as illustrated in the ways that “combine academic expertise and experience, classroom rapport, and interest in their students.” And given the ten-to-one student-to-faculty ratio, it is no surprise that students and faculty form close relationships. Undergrads appreciate how professors treat them as intelligent individuals, saying they “are not trying to push their own agenda onto the students” and “lead us to reach our own conclusions and develop our own ideas rather than having us regurgitate lecture material.” Many attest that the faculty at UD “want [them] to succeed,” and their teachers’ unending support has “made this university [their] home.”

Student Body

Community is strong at University of Dallas. Everyone at UD is “very close and welcoming [which] makes it easy to find a group of people with which you can learn and grow together,” and the core “really does bond students together in the first years of college before getting more specific major-only classes.” As one undergrad notes, “Every student, no matter what major, can relate to any other student because they all have the same academic background to some extent.” With more than seventy-five percent of this “fun and respectful student body” identifying as Catholic, “the authenticity of the Catholic tradition is prevalent on campus and stays true to its nature.” Enrollees find that with so much in common between their academics and their commitment to Catholic values, students will “talk all the time and for hours about everything, and it’s awesome.” Above all, undergrads at UD agree that they choose to “[gild] their days spending genuine and meaningful time with one another when they aren’t studying.”

Campus Life

At this “very academic focused” university “most students study together” across campus “in lounges, [the] library, the cafeteria, empty classrooms, [and other] main areas”, as the “majority of the week is spent doing homework.” But when undergrads are ready for a break, the school “has really unique traditions that offer plenty of occasions for fun activities.” For instance, the Campus Activities Board hosts weekly TGIT (Thank. Goodness. It’s. Thursday!) events at the bar and grill on campus, which include live music, drinks, and themes, as well as Quiz Bowl on Wednesdays, where students “can win gift cards and prizes.” For those looking for relief in the form of a spiritual community, “daily Mass is also a popular weekday activity.” On the weekends, you’re never too far from your friends since all students under the age of twenty-one are required to live on campus in one of seven residence halls. In the dorms, undergrads enjoy participating in “programs put on by the resident assistants.” Many also make plans to “attend sporting events [together] or hang out in each other’s dorm rooms for fun.” And when they’re looking to get off campus for a bit, students “love to have bonfires, go on road trips, hang out in coffee shops, and have get-togethers.”

Contact & Visit

Campus Visits Contact

Contact
Olivia Hernandez
Campus Visit Coordinator

Address
Office of Admissions
1845 East Northgate Drive
Irving, TX 75062

Phone
972-721-5266

Email
ojhernandez@udallas.edu.

Experience College Life

Most Popular Places On Campus
Church of the Incarnation
Cappuccino Bar
The Mall
The Rathskeller
Art Village

Most Popular Places Off Campus
American Airlines Center
Deep Ellum/Downtown Dallas/Uptown
Dallas Museum of Art/Nasher Sculpture Center
AT&T Stadium
GlobeLife Park

Campus Tours

Campus Visiting Center
M-F
8-5
972-721-5266

Campus Tours
Appointment Required: Yes
Dates: Year-round
Times: Varies
Average Length: Varies

On Campus Interview

Campus Interviews
No

Information Sessions
Not Available

Times

Faculty and Coach Visits

Dates/Times Available
Year-round

Arrangements
Contact Admissions Office

Advance Notice
2 weeks

Contact Email Address for Visit
crusader@udallas.edu

Class Visits

Dates/Times Available
Academic Year

Arrangements
Contact Admissions Office

Overnight Dorm Stays

Overnight Dorm Stays
Available

Arrangements
Contact Admissions Office

Limitations
Sunday-Thursday only, high school seniors only

Transportation

Types of Transportation Available to Campus
DFW International Airport and Dallas Love Field are within 12 miles of campus. DART light rail access to campus from DFW Airport. Rideshare, taxis, and rental cars are readily available. Plenty of parking available on campus.

Driving Instructions to Campus
https://udallas.edu/visitors/directions.php

Admissions

Applicants: 4,676
Acceptance Rate: 45%
Average HS GPA: 3.83







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